Where We Work

We work in India with an aim to build a strong South Asia regional network of human rights advocates. 

 

Our first project in Assam on the tea garden workers rights was launch in India in early 2013 and secound project in Delhi on urban housing issues will be lauched in early 2014.

 

 


 

South Asia’s Rising Socio-Economic Inequality

 

Annual GDP rates of an average 6.4% mask worsening socio-economic inequality throughout the region. Indeed, South Asia is the hunger and slum capital of the world, with a staggering 300 million people living in non-habitable conditions. Forced evictions and illegal demolitions, often carried out in the name of development, render millions of people homeless, with disproportionate effects on vulnerable groups such as women, children, dalits, economic migrants, and indigenous persons. South Asia also boasts some of the world’s lowest public health expenditures pro capita and highest rates of maternal and infant mortality. Indeed, more than one third of the world’s preventable maternal deaths occur in the region, attributed to delay and denials in accessing basic healthcare. Pervasive discrimination further impedes equal access to a range of fundamental economic and social rights, with the 2011 UNDP Gender Inequality Index ranking the South Asia as the most unequal region. Women lag behind men in all areas, including education, health, and participation in the labor force, leading the UN to conclude that “gender inequality remains a barrier to progress, justice and social stability, and deprives the region of a significant source of human potential.”

Programs

Right to Adequate Housing

Right to Adequate Housing

Housing is a core component of the right to an adequate standard of living.  Read More.

Right to Food

Right to Food

It is a fundamental right under Article 21 of the Right to Life, observes Supreme Court of India.  Read More.

Right to Health

Right to Health

State has to guarantee that the right to health is available, accessible and of high quality.  Read More.